Tagged: career

What experience has had the biggest impact on your career? (Part Two)

We asked the members of the in silico Plants editorial board about the experience that has had the biggest impact on their career. This is what they said:   In 1977, while doing my undergraduate study at Stellenbosch University, the crop physiology lecturer, Dr George Craven, asked his students to write a computer program to mimic plant growth using basic growth analysis principles. We used punch cards for a mainframe computer. My program eventually worked! The experience opened my eyes to the power and elegance of crop simulation modelling, and probably gave direction to my research interests and career. I...

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What experience has had the biggest impact on your career?

We asked the members of the in silico Plants editorial board about the experience that has had the biggest impact on their career. This is what they said:   A key moment was attending the ‘Mathematical modelling of plant development and gene networks’ meeting in Warwick in 2004, in the final few months of my PhD. It was a great meeting scientifically, opened up new contacts, and later I learned that it was a crucial element on my CV that helped get me a postdoc job, leading to a fellowship and setting up my academic career. This was all because...

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Social media tips and tools for scientists

Should scientists use social media for work purposes? What types of content can researchers put online and how can they make it reach even further? How to engage students via Twitter? How do you manage information overload? These were some of the topics and questions we addressed in our workshop ‘Linking research and teaching with social media’. In this post, like in the session, I am covering the research aspect, whereas Dr Jeremy Pritchard talked about uses of social media for teaching.I have made my slides available online and the presentation is embedded at the end of this post, so...

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Message to all students

So, you want to earn a lot of money after you graduate to pay off all those debts, right? In that case, according to Which University, you should have done Medicine or Dentistry. But you didn’t get in to those subjects (or why would you be reading AoB Blog – are you lost?) – so your next best choice to become filthy rich is: Botany (plant sciences): starting salary £28,591 That’s better than Veterinary Medicine and Dentistry (£25,885), Biotechnology and industrial biotechnology (£26,309) or Economics (£25,717) So if you want to make some serious money, you’d better keep reading this...

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Happy International Women’s Day 2012!

 “Don’t be afraid of hard work. Nothing worthwhile comes easily. Don’t let others discourage you or tell you that you can’t do it. In my day I was told women didn’t go into chemistry. I saw no reason why we couldn’t.”   Gertrude B. Elion, Nobel Laureate 1988. A few days ago, Prof Alice Roberts, the first Professor of Public Engagement, tweeted about the still shockingly low number of female professors in science.  In my opinion, there are two main reasons for the low numbers of female scientists in academia. The first one is linked to inspiring girls and female...

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Faces of Plant Cell Biology: A series on PlantCellBiology.com from Anne Osterrieder

Anne Osterrieder has a new series on her blog called Faces of plant cell biologists, where we are asked a series of questions. So far, it has featured Charlotte Carroll (also an AoBBlog.com guest author here), Chris Hawes and Kentaro Tamura, who all answer Anne’s questions is surprisingly contrasting but  complementary ways. Today, I have been selected and my interview is on her blog via YouTube – as usual best viewed in 1080p if you have a fast internet. All the contributors so far have featured videos in their presentations, and perhaps because we study dynamic processes, this is very appropriate! I...

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