Tagged: fragmentation





Pollinator visitation rates and fruit set of two Mexican dry forest Tillandsia species

Consequences of habitat fragmentation on the reproductive success of two Tillandsia species with contrasting life history strategies

Fragmentation of natural habitats generally has negative effects on the reproductive success of many plant species; however, little is known about epiphytic plants. Epiphytes are non-parasitic plants that grow on other plants and they represent almost 10 % of vascular plant species. They are particularly important to tropical forest ecosystems due to their high taxonomic and functional diversity, and their roles in supplying nutrients, water and shelter for other organisms. Epiphytes are considered to be highly sensitive to habitat disturbance because they have low growth rates, delayed sexual maturity, limited seed dispersal, and no seed bank. A recent study by...

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Dispersal and establishment of vascular epiphytes in modified landscapes

The ongoing destruction of old-growth forests puts tropical forest species, with epiphytes as a key element, under great pressure. To maintain viable epiphyte communities in fragmented landscapes, remaining habitable patches have to be sufficiently connected. In a recent study published in AoB PLANTS, Einzmann and Zotz experimentally studied four vital dispersal steps of a vascular epiphyte in human modified-landscapes. Their findings suggest a high capacity for dispersal and successful early establishment for anemochorous species. Thus, potentially regenerating forests may receive considerable input from sources such as pasture trees and in this way gain structural complexity, which also greatly enhances their...

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Jumellea fragrans

Commonness, reproductive patterns and inbreeding depression of two Jumellea species

Population size reduction can threaten long-term persistence of plant populations through loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding depression. Blambert et al. evaluate the consequences of population size reduction by comparing mating patterns, levels of genetic diversity and inbreeding depression of the rare and fragmented Jumellea fragrans and the widespread J. rossii. Population size reduction had a negative impact on genetic diversity of J. fragrans, but factors such as mating system or population history can limit the effects.

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Genetic connectivity and evolution in Crepis

Genetic connectivity and evolution in Crepis

Islands play a central role in the study of plant evolution in the Mediterranean. Mayol et al. analyse the impact of varying patterns of habitat occupancy on genetic diversity and structure in Crepis triasii, an endemic plant from the eastern Balearic Islands, and find that genetic diversity is highly structured and positively correlated with population connectivity in the landscape. The results support the importance of restricted gene flow and drift as drivers of plant evolution in Mediterranean continental islands, and emphasize the importance of gene flow in preventing genetic erosion and maintaining the evolutionary potential of populations.

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