Tagged: invasiveness


Graph of heteromorph and monomorph naturalization

Fruit heteromorphism and naturalization success in Asteraceae

Finding the factors that explain invasion success of species is a major objective in ecology. The combination of extensive data on fruit heteromorphism in Asteraceae and the largest global plant-naturalization database offered the unprecedented possibility to add a missing piece to the naturalization-success puzzle.

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A global assessment of a large monocot family highlights the need for group-specific analyses of invasiveness

There are several emerging generalizations in invasion biology, but often the factors determining invasiveness are group-specific. Similarly to certain other plant families, Araceae species (arums or aroids) that have large native ranges and that have been widely introduced are more likely to become invasive. What is unique to the family is the great diversity of growth forms, some of which are more likely to become invasive than others. In a recent study published in AoB PLANTS, Moodley et al. identify nine lineages in the family that have a greater tendency to invasiveness (including the duckweed lineage, as well as the...

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Functional traits and plant invasions (Invited Review)

Functional traits and plant invasions (Invited Review)

Global environmental change will affect non-native plant invasions, with profound potential impacts on native plant populations, communities and ecosystems. In this context, Drenovsky et al. review plant functional traits, particularly those that drive invader abundance (invasiveness) and impacts, as well as the integration of these traits across multiple ecological scales. They consider that an understanding of functional traits, their responsiveness to environmental change, and their ability to drive both invasiveness and impacts is critical to improving restoration and management strategies in response to non-native species. From this perspective, they address the question of how a functional trait framework can be applied to...

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Polyploidy and plant invasions (Invited Review)

Polyploidy and plant invasions (Invited Review)

Biological invasions are a major ecological and socio-economic problem in many parts of the world. Te Beest et al. synthesize current knowledge on the importance of polyploidy for the invasion of introduced plants, and suggest that it may increase the success of plant invaders through a combination of pre-adaptation, where polyploids have a higher survival rate and fitness in the earliest establishment phase, and the possibility for subsequent adaptation due to a larger gene pool. Alternatively, polyploidization may play an important role by restoring sexual reproduction after hybridization or, conversely, allowing for asexual reproduction in the absence of suitable mates.

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