Tagged: Japan




Free—open access paper: Isolated history of the coastal plant Lathyrus japonicus (Leguminosae) in Lake Biwa, an ancient freshwater lake

Lathyrus japonicus commonly inhabits seashores. However it also grows near the shores of an inland lake (Lake Biwa, an ancient japanese freshwater lake) where it is assumed to have been isolated for a long time. The impact of this long-term isolation on phylogeographic and population structures is described. This reveals low genetic diversity due to the bottleneck effect. Implications for these dwindling inland populations and their conservation are discussed in this free—open access paper.

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What happens now to agriculture in Japan?

There’s an interesting post on Alex Tiller’s Blog on Agriculture and Farming that I missed earlier. Alex asks Will Agriculture in Japan Survive? It’s a timely question as the recent tsunami hit over 10% of rice-producing areas in Japan. As Alex points out there really isn’t a lot of room to expand agriculture because Japan is mostly mountains. Things get worse when you add the after-effects of the Fukushima meltdown. Visit Alex Tiller’s blog to read more.

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