Tagged: lateral roots



Appearance of the endodermis and exodermis.

Apoplastic barriers in maize lateral roots

Roots rely on apoplastic barriers for nutrient absorption. However, little is known about the establishment of these barriers within the lateral roots. The branching, permeability of the outer cell layers and differentiation of the endo- and exodermis are studied in primary roots and various laterals of Zea mays under different stress factors of agronomic importance (salinity, heavy metal toxicity, hypoxia, etc.). Tylová et al. propose that fine laterals represent portions of a complex root system with a less advanced state of endodermis and exodermis differentiation, but with substantial ability to modify maturation of exodermis in response to environmental conditions. Branching...

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Scheme for describing the terminology of roots and the definition of root traits.

Relationships between root diameter, length and branching of maize

The effect of diameter variation on root elongation, branching and topological connections has not been examined systematically in a population of high-order roots, nor along the roots. Wu et al. used very detailed information on the geometry and topology of the root system of field-grown maize to study the relationships between root diameter and other root architectural characteristics. The final length of a lateral root was associated with the size of the basal root and the extent of diameter change along the root, and the branching density of laterals was determined by the diameter and the positions of the bearing...

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Regulation of root morphogenesis in arbuscular mycorrhizae (Review)

Regulation of root morphogenesis in arbuscular mycorrhizae (Review)

Increased root branching is recognized as a general feature of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) roots, but a full understanding of the mechanisms involved is still lacking. Fusconi reviews the subject and concludes that fungal exudates are probably the main compounds regulating AM root morphogenesis during the first colonization steps, while a complex network of interactions governs root development in established AMs. The possible involvements of phosphate, which generally increases in AM plants, and of variations in sugar transport and in hormone homeostasis, signalling and interactions are also discussed.

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