Tagged: light interception



Computer Modelling of Crop Alignments Could Fight Weeds in an Environmentally Way

Light interception is closely related to canopy architecture. Few studies based on multi-view photography have been conducted in a field environment, particularly studies that link 3D plant architecture with a radiation model to quantify the dynamic canopy light interception. In this study, Binglin Zhu and colleagues combined realistic 3D plant architecture with a radiation model to quantify and evaluate the effect of differences in planting patterns and row orientations on canopy light interception. The three-dimensional architecture of maize and soybean plants were reconstructed for sole crops and intercrops based on multi-view images obtained at five growth dates in the field....

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Representative reconstructed canopies with the maximum PPFD ranges colour coded for 1200 h.

Predicting photosynthetic productivity of intercropping systems with image-based reconstruction

Intercropping systems contain two or more species simultaneously in close proximity. Due to contrasting features of the component crops, quantification of the light environment and photosynthetic productivity remains challenging to achieve, however it is an essential component of productivity. Burgess et al. combine three-dimensional reconstruction with ray tracing to provide a novel, accurate method of exploring the light environment within an intercrop that does not require difficult measurements of light interception and data-intensive manual reconstruction. The presented method provides new opportunities for calculating potential productivity, enables the quantification of dynamic physiological characteristics of crops, and the prediction of new productive...

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Small and large twigs

Revising Corner’s rule: how to best partition twig leaf area

Corner’s rule states that in woody plants, twigs (current-year shoots) with thicker stems support larger leaves. Larger leaf areas require thicker twigs for hydraulic and mechanical support, but a question remains as to why the pattern of thicker twigs resulting in larger leaves emerges, and also as to whether total leaf area should be partitioned into many small leaves or a few large leaves. Corner’s rule implies that larger twig leaf areas should be partitioned into larger sized leaves. Smith et al. verified Corner’s rule in six co-occurring and functionally similar species, finding that individual increases in leaf size correlate...

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Nitrogen addition and harvest frequency rather than initial plant species composition, determine vertical structure and light interception in permanent grasslands

Recent biodiversity experiments using sown plant communities suggest a positive effect of plant species diversity on ecosystem functioning and resource use. However, are these experimental results applicable to agriculturally managed grassland? In a new study published in AoB PLANTS, Petersen and Isselstein analysed vegetation structure and light interception in managed grassland in which species composition had been manipulated by herbicides. They expected the functionally more diverse plots (grasses and forbs in equal amounts) to better intercept the light than plots containing more than 90% grasses due to an optimal arrangement of leaves in space. However, management (fertilization and mowing regime)...

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Modelling fruit temperature dynamics in apple

Modelling fruit temperature dynamics in apple

Although fruit temperature is known to be a key parameter involved in fruit quality, sunburn injury and pest development, no specific modelling approach to it has been developed. Saudreau et al. generate a model based on three-dimensional virtual representation of apple trees (Malus domestica) linked with a physical-based fruit-temperature dynamical model. The model is able to simulate temperature dynamics at both the scale of fruit-temperature gradients and within-tree-crown variability in fruit temperature, and offers opportunities for modelling effects of within-crown architecture on fruit thermal responses in horticultural studies.

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