Continuous variation in herkogamy in Mediterranean honeysuckle populations

Herkogamy, the spatial separation of sex organs in hermaphroditic plants, is thought to have evolved to reduce self-pollination and inbreeding within a population. Yet there has been little evidence to support these hypotheses. Much work in this field has focussed on heterostyly, in which two or three distinct and reciprocal herkogamy morphs are found in the same breeding population. The study of continuous variation in herkogamy, in which plants exhibit continuous variation in the separation of sex organs, has received far less attention. However, it warrants further attention, because the positions of plant sex organs can have profound implications for...

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