Tagged: Myrtaceae



Predicted regions of historical stability in the Phylocallyx clade across the Quaternary

Climate change refugia and species diversity in Eugenia

Eugenia is the most species-rich Neotropical genus. This ‘Research in Context’ article explores the extraordinary evolutionary success of Eugenia sect. Phyllocalyx using a phylogenetic framework, molecular dating, ancestral area reconstruction and ecological niche modelling. Phylogenetic relationships reveal that Eugenia diversified most rapidly within the eastern tropical American forests, dispersing twice to the cerrado and once to the southern Amazon, and exhibiting different species composition from north-eastern and south-eastern Atlantic forests. De Oliveira Bünger et al. suggest that sites of climate stability provided a refugium in the biodiversity hotspot of the south-eastern Atlantic forest during the Quaternary, thereby contributing to elevated...

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Tree and climate

Climate change and the decline of a foundation tree species

A worldwide increase in tree decline and mortality has been linked to climate change, and where these represent foundation species this can have important implications for ecosystem functions. Dalmaris et al. undertake phylogeographic analyses across the species range of Eucalyptus wandoo, an endemic tree of south-western Australia, and find that a combination of phylogeography and paleo-distribution modelling can provide an evolutionary context for climate-driven tree decline, as both can be used to cross-validate evidence for refugia and contraction under harsh climatic conditions. The contraction of E. wandoo from lower rainfall areas is consistent with current observations of decline on the...

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