Tagged: seed set



Continuous variation in herkogamy in Mediterranean honeysuckle populations

Herkogamy, the spatial separation of sex organs in hermaphroditic plants, is thought to have evolved to reduce self-pollination and inbreeding within a population. Yet there has been little evidence to support these hypotheses. Much work in this field has focussed on heterostyly, in which two or three distinct and reciprocal herkogamy morphs are found in the same breeding population. The study of continuous variation in herkogamy, in which plants exhibit continuous variation in the separation of sex organs, has received far less attention. However, it warrants further attention, because the positions of plant sex organs can have profound implications for...

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Attract them anyway – Benefits of large, showy flowers in a highly autogamous, carnivorous plant species

Despite being a highly autogamous or self-pollinating species, the carnivorous plant Drosophyllum lusitanicum (Drosophyllaceae) produces large, bright-yellow flowers. In a recent study published in AoB PLANTS, Salces-Castellano et al. used a flower removal and a pollination experiment to assess, respectively, whether large flowers in this species may serve as an attracting device to prey insects or whether previously reported high selfing rates for this species in peripheral populations may be lower in more central, less isolated populations. They detected a significant increase (15–25%) in the seed set of experimentally self-pollinated flowers and flowers exposed to insect visitation compared with bagged,...

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Relationship between heterospecific pollen and conspecific pollen.

Examining the impact of heterospecific pollen deposition in the field

Most work on the impacts of heterospecific pollen deposition on plant fecundity has utilized hand-pollination experiments in greenhouse settings, and therefore we know little about the reproductive effects in the field. Briggs et al. explored how patterns of naturally deposited heterospecific pollen relate to the reproductive output of Delphinium barbeyi. Heterospecific pollen deposition is common but at low levels across stigmas; there is a negative interaction between the effects of conspecific pollen and heterospecific pollen amount: the effect of conspecific pollen on viable seed production becomes weaker with greater heterospecific deposition on stigmas. Greenhouse hand-pollination studies and field studies should...

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