Tagged: self-incompatibility



How do plant hybrids aid invasions?

There’s a common belief that hybridization of plants can aid invasions through adaptive introgression. This is where a hybrid breeds with one of its parent species, so that the parent species eventually adopts a new gene. An example might be herbicide resistance transferring from crops to wild plants. In a new paper in Annals of Botany, Chengjun Li and colleagues consider how hybrids may help in a different way. A limiting factor on invasions is finding plants to mate with. “Following long-distance dispersal, a self-incompatible (SI) colonizer may experience an Allee effect because of limited mate availability,” write the authors....

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Intraspecific variation of self-incompatibility in the distylous plant Primula merrilliana

Heterostyly, a term referred to plant species comprising either two (distyly) or three (tristyly) self-incompatible floral morphs that differ reciprocally in the positions of stigmas and anthers (i.e. reciprocal herkogamy), is considered as one of the most effective mechanisms to avoid selfing and promote outcrossing. This complex floral syndrome, which occurs in at least 28 families of flowering plants, represents a remarkable example of convergent evolution. Therefore, explaining the origin, function and genetic basis of heterostyly has attracted considerable attention ever since Darwin’s classic book on polymorphic sexual systems in plants. Self and intramorph incompatibility is generally considered to play...

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Stigmatic limitations on reproductive success in a paleotropical tree

Success in reproduction is subject to the successful initiation as well as successful completion of a chain of consecutive events starting from flower formation and ending with viable seed production. A recent article published by Raina et al. in AoB PLANTS focuses on how thigmotropic stigmas, which open, close and re-open in response to touch, play a role in limiting fruit set of plants in their non-native environment. Their pollination success requires optimum pollen transfer in terms of its quality as well as quantity and is dependent on efficient pollinator visitation. The study is particularly valuable for both horticultural purposes...

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toadflax Linaria cavanillesii

Mixed mating after the loss of self-incompatibility in a long-living perennial herb

Flowering plants display an extensive range of adaptive floral forms, which are often correlated with their mating systems. The maintenance of contrasting strategies such as those adopted by obligate outcrossers compared to populations that have evolved a selfing system is one of the most studied topics in reproductive evolution. Voillemot and Pannell study variation in mating systems in Spanish toadflax Linaria cavanillesii, a long-lived perennial species. Some unexpected features are reported, such as an absence of shift in flower morphology in the self-compatible population, together with the maintenance of outcrossing despite no apparent inbreeding depression.

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Models for the acceptance of compatible pollen and the rejection of self-incompatible pollen in Arabidopsis species.

Hanging On To Your Date, Avoiding Incest And Not Getting Infected – All In A Day’s Work For Flowers Of The Mustard Family

In the mustard family, which includes the important crop Brassica (rapeseed/canola) and the model plant Arabidopsis, the surfaces of the female stigmatic cells are dry. These cells – on which the pollen grains land – are thought to be more advanced than those of the wet stigmas of many other plants because they do not trap fungal spores (or pollen grains of many other species), and can discriminate between self and cross pollen of their own species and thus avoid self-pollination. The evolution of these stigmas has, however, involved the development of a good deal of complex cell biology –...

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Evolution and speciation in Sorbus

Evolution and speciation in Sorbus

Interspecific hybridization and polyploidy are key processes in plant evolution and are responsible for ongoing genetic diversification in the genus Sorbus (Rosaceae). Ludwig et al. study mating systems of diploid, triploid and tetraploid taxa in a diversity ‘hotspot’ for Sorbus in south-west England and find mating inter-relationships to be complex, and to provide the driving force for hybridization and ongoing genetic diversification. In particular, the presence of self-incompatibility (SI) in triploid pseudogamous apomicts imposes a requirement for interspecific cross-pollination, thereby facilitating continuing diversification and evolution through rare sexual hybridization events. This is the first report of naturally occurring pseudogamous apomictic SI...

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